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The agenda is new



Thambi

Thambi
Genre: Action
Director: Seeman
Cast: Madhavan, Pooja, Vadivelu, Biju Menon
Storyline: Madhavan wants to reform society and begins with the bad men he's familiar with.
Bottomline: A Utopian hero!

He's an action hero with an impossible agenda. His mission is reformation, not revenge. Writer-director Seeman showcases this brand of hero material in Mid Valley Entertainment's `Thambi' (U). It is a comeback film of sorts for Madhavan. He has worked hard on the role and whether silent or emotional, his essay is sincere. And probably after Vikram in `Pithamagan,' it is Madhavan in `Thambi,' who has acted without blinking his eyes. The way he rolls them in anger is something he's not tried before. Only that at times his decibel level tests your aural nerves.

Thambi (Madhavan) is a socially aware young man, who knows that an eye for an eye principle can only make the whole world blind. A predictable flashback is behind Thambi's actions. But what is new is for once the hero doesn't turn vengeful. He beats up the bad men only to din a sense of right and wrong in them... The underworld dons in `Thambi' are not the tough cookies you are used to.

Main players

Despite trying to look a rustic in duets and a ruffian in fights, Madhavan is unable to shed off his classy looks completely. Pooja is all hands and legs, when she is introduced as a classical dancer. But in portrayal of emotions she's apt. And next time the hero or heroine is expected to play on an instrument for a shot, let them take pains to know the functional basics. Pooja's fingers on the lower frets for the high veena notes, is an example.

Biju Menon plays a convincing villain. But the inimicality of his wife is puzzling.

The dialogue speaks volumes of Seeman's penning skills. Balasubramaniam's lighting and use of blue tones make an impact. And locations have been chosen with an eye on the aesthetics.Vikram Dharma delivers the goods in this stunt-oriented venture. The dumping yard where the action begins and its backdrop make you go back to the credits for artwork — it is Maniraj. The common yet insightful thoughts in the lyric of `Ennamma ... ' (Na. Muthukumar) evoke a smile. The simple tune rings in your ears. Vidyasagar presents a couple of melodies too. But re-recording in certain sequences is loud. Bharatiyar's `Udalinai Urudhi Sei' has been astutely used twice in the film — the effectiveness is much more the second time (in the end). You may have never seen such uniformly slow dance movements as in `Thambi.' Prasanna is the choreographer.

Seeman's aim is exalted, his screenplay maintains pace and his dialogue is poignant. At the same time, but for the hero's character, the story traverses the beaten path.

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

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